Jun 132018
 

The Richland County Sheriff’s Department’s Project Lifesaver team aims to “bring loved ones home” safely when electronic tracking is needed to find at-risk wanderers – clients with Alzheimer’s, autism, Downs Syndrome or traumatic brain injury.  Deputy Amanda Jordan (shown at left in photo with Rotarian Daniel Moses) briefed Capital Rotary on June 13, noting that 44 local clients and their families are enrolled in the program founded in Virginia nearly 20 years ago.  Project Lifesaver began in Richland County in 2006 with only eight deputies and three clients.  Today 80 deputies are trained, certified specialists in locating missing persons via electronic searching – a process that usually takes less 30 minutes as compared to a normal physical search lasting up to nine hours and sometimes involving hundreds of officers and volunteers.  Jordan said Project Lifesaver is cost effective for law enforcement and provides better protection for lost individuals.  Richland County does not charge its residents or their at-risk loved ones for receiving a transmitter and joining the program.  Jordan, a University of South Carolina graduate, has served with the Sheriff’s Department for 14 years.  She coordinates Project Lifesaver for the State of South Carolina, where 18 counties have signed on.  There are 1,300 participating agencies across the US, Canada and Australia.  To date more than 3,400 client rescues have been reported.

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