May 172018
 

Capital Rotary members got the “straight poop” about Riverbanks Zoo’s composting success from guest speaker John Davis on May 16.  Davis (left, in photo with Rotarian Bud Foy) said the “bottom line” is that animal manure can be a profit-maker instead of a wasted byproduct.  He holds a degree in wildlife biology from Kansas State University and has run the composting program since 2009 as Director of Animal Care and Welfare at Riverbanks Zoo and Garden.  The zoo must contend with about 1,200 pounds of excrement daily, mostly from its elephant, giraffe and zebra populations.  After collection, the manure decomposes and cures in a special storage area while being monitored for temperature and moisture.  When it reaches the stage where it’s ready to be called “natural soil amendment,” the compost can be distributed at Riverbanks Garden and sold.  It’s available for gift shop purchase or by the pick-up truckload during spring and fall bulk sales.  Some of the sale proceeds go to the zoo’s conservation fund that supports projects to save wildlife and wildlife habitat all over the world.  Each year Riverbanks converts 13,418 cubic feet of dung into money-making compost.

 

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